Remember When April 23, 2020

10 years ago (2010)

•A rural Beaver Creek man said he’s grateful to be alive after surviving a grain bin accident Wednesday afternoon.

Beaver Creek fire and rescue crews were the first on the scene of the Everett Vande Voort farm where a 911 call from his wife, Jeanette, said he was trapped in the bin.

He had been augering corn out of the bin into a wagon and noticed wet corn was clogging the flow.

Vande Voort, 74, said he climbed inside to loosen the grain, and that’s when the corn moved in around his legs, trapping him.

“I know better,” he said. “I know you’re not supposed to do that. And you’re supposed to have someone on the outside when you do that. … But we get so independent.”

He said the corn had coned down the middle of the bin to about 4 feet deep, but it was steeper on the sides and started flowing downward on him. “Next thing I knew, I was in up to my armpits.”

Stirator equipment suspended in the middle of the bin was the nearest support. “I reached up and hung on,” he said.

It was 12:30 p.m. and Vande Voort said he was supposed to have a meeting with his banker at 1:30 p.m. at the farm.

“When I didn’t show up at the house, he and my wife came looking for me,” Vande Voort said.

 

25 years ago (1995)

•At 2 p.m. Wednesday, immigration officials  arrived at IBP, Luverne, with three vans and a list of 41 names.

The individuals on the list had been investigated by the United States Department of Justice Immigration and Naturalization Service for possessing and using fraudulent identification documents. …

The investigation was prompted in February when an IBP employee was arrested in Worthington. In the course of the arrest, police found fraudulent identification on the man and learned he had used those documents to gain employment at IBP, Luverne. …

Wednesday’s arrest was conducted in conjunction with several other immigrations arrests. On Tuesday, 23 people from neighboring areas were arrested. Monfort was not audited in this investigation.

By the end of the day Wednesday, about 50 additional arrests were made, including those at IBP. Two of these were found at the Minneapolis Convention Center by Secret Service agents during a security sweep prior to a visit by President Bill Clinton.

 

50 years ago (1970)

•Federal spending in Rock County during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1969, amounted to more than $9.9 million.

Impact of federally funded programs in the county for the year was disclosed in a report prepared by the State Office of Economic Opportunity.

The total figure, $9,950,919, includes all federal outlays, including agriculture, welfare, conservation, post offices, savings bonds, OEO programs, social security, veterans and railroad pension, etc.

Biggest expenditure in Rock County was $5,529,041, made by the Department of Agriculture. This included direct payments to farmers, food for school lunches, rural electrification loans, county extension service, and agriculture stabilization and conservation service, just to name a few of the various programs.

 

75 years ago (1945)

•David, two-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Gabrielson of Luverne, had his right leg broken above the knee Saturday when he was kicked by a horse. He was brought to a local doctor and later taken to the Sioux Valley hospital, where he is now a patient.

Gus Nelson, Luverne, who is working for Oliver Olson, of Hills, had his right leg broken Saturday while plowing at the Olson farm. He is convalescing at his home.

 

100 years ago (1920)

•Hartenstein’s Pharmacy, Luverne’s new drug store, was opened to the public Wednesday in the Graaf building formerly occupied by the Cooper-Steward clothing store, under the ownership and management of E. S. Hartenstein.  

Mr. Hartenstein has been here since last November awaiting the arrival of fixtures and stock for the store, but it was not until this week that he could open the store.

The new stock is confined exclusively to drugs and drug sundries, with the exception that the store will also cater to the soda fountain, fancy box candies and cigar trade.

Mr. Hartenstein was for several years engaged in the drug business at Spencer, S. D., is a registered pharmacist, a graduate of the Philadelphia College, and holds degrees of pharmaceutical chemistry and doctor of pharmacy.

 

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